You are here

Michigan’s Move on Immigration

Wednesday, May 31, 2017

Immigration has been at the center of a wide range of policy discussions including homeland security, economic and work force development as well as education benefits, health coverage, and driver privileges extended to visitors filling temporary jobs. IPPSR’s May 31st policy forum will look at the impact of more recent discussion of immigration and Michigan’s stance on foreign visitors and immigrants to our State. Particular attention will be on Asian immigrants given that recruitment for IT and tech jobs are mostly conducted among this immigrant group and are said to be most affected by visa reform.

As host of the May forum discussion, the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research thanks Michigan State University’s Asian Studies Center and the Center for International Business Education and Research (CIBER) for their sponsorship.

Panelist Biographical Information:

  • Stephanie Nawyn, associate professor, MSU’s Department of Sociology and co-director of the Center for Gender in Global Context
    Focus: Reasons for migration and immigration, concerns for unauthorized migration and refugee admissions
  • Christine Bargerstock, Associate Director, Office of International Students and Scholars, MSU International Studies and Programs
    Focus: Education as a channel for migration and immigration, current realities of the immigration process
  • Karen Phillippi, Deputy Director, Michigan Office for New Americans
    Focus: Economic impact of immigration, jobs and community integration
  • Bing Goei, director, Michigan Office for New Americans (MONA)
    Focus: Michigan immigration policies and practices, state trends

Presentation

Pictures

The Obscurity of Human Trafficking

Wednesday, April 19, 2017

It is known as modern day slavery and an enterprise of buying, selling, and smuggling people second only to the international drug and arms trade economy.

The average age for victims of human trafficking is 12 and the markets are varied – domestic and farm labor, prostitution, begging and even organ donation. As recently as March 2017, such an arrest was made in Michigan’s Capitol City where law officials say simple awareness can help communities further fight against the crime. How are state legislators, law enforcement and human service providers collaborating to combat human trafficking? What are the intervention services, protection and judicial options for survivors? Given an uptick in this crime, how might state human trafficking policies be revised to reduce the incidence of such a horrific crime? IPPSR’s April 19 Policy Forum will address these questions with the help of panelists:

Jane White, Director and Founder of the Michigan Human Trafficking Task Force, a non-profit organization through the School of Criminal Justice at Michigan State University. She has worked with large city governments including police departments and juvenile courts in Michigan, Mississippi, Illinois, Wisconsin, Virginia, Florida, and California to tackle human trafficking. She serves the Michigan Commission on Human Trafficking by appointment of Michigan’s Attorney General Bill Schuette.

Sheila Meshinski, Staff Development Advisor for Henry Ford Health System, and a former emergency room nurse for 35 years, dedicated to educating the public and healthcare community on human trafficking. She belongs to the International Forensic Nurse Association and is a Governor’s appointee to the Michigan Human Trafficking Task Force.

Meredith Reese, Vice President of Treatment Programs for Vista Maria, a human services agency provider to victims of abuse, neglect, and trauma. She is a Best Practice Leadership Award recipient from the Michigan Department of Health and Human Services for her work in planning and implementing residential treatment and foster care programs for those most in need.

Kelly Carter, Assistant Attorney General of Michigan, Criminal Division, Prosecutor for Human Traffickers and expert advisor to House and Senate subcommittees considering legislation involving child sexual exploitation and human trafficking. She trains legal, health and other community professionals throughout Michigan to identify and address human trafficking.

Michigan State University’s Institute Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR) is the host of this forum. Given Michigan’s international border and the incident of human trafficking across it, we appreciate the co-sponsorship of the Canadian Studies Center, International Studies and Programs, at Michigan State University.

Images

A Fight for Life – Tackling Opioid Addiction

Wednesday, March 15, 2017

Opioid addiction in our country has grown to epidemic proportions ending in thousands of Michigan deaths in recent years. According to the Michigan Prescription Drug and Opioid Commission formed by Governor Snyder in June 2016, prescriptions for opioid-related drugs increased from 180 million in 2007 to 745 million in 2014, more than quadrupling our state’s prescriptions for painkillers. In 2016, Michigan and nearly every other state enacted legislation addressing the abuse of opioids, including heroin and prescription drugs.  The March Forum panel will further understanding of the addiction problem, how it is now being addressed, and considerations for further tackling the problem with panelists:

Panelist Biographical Info :

  • David Neff - Osteopathic medical physician with addiction research and a pharmaceutical studies background
  • Jed Magen - Physician and psychiatrist working with addicts and studying the neuro- physiological side of addiction
  • Mike Hirst - Michigan parent who shares a first –hand experience of the impact of this problem on families and communities
  • Lisa Gee-Cram - Detective lieutenant with the Michigan State Police combating the addiction problem through education and enforcement measures
  • See all the panelist biographical information (.pdf)

Presentations

Related News

Panelists Urge More Attention, Funding for Opiate Addiction, Gongwer Michigan Report March 15th 2017 (.pdf)

Autonomous Vehicles

Wednesday, February 15, 2017

Signed legislation allowing testing of automated motor vehicles on Michigan roadways has created a buzz of activity among manufacturers, technology geeks, community planners, transportation professionals and others. Driverless cars are expected on the sales lot in the next five years or so. As this innovation unfolds, what are policy makers, community planners and economy watch dogs to consider while thinking through secure infrastructure as well as a policy framework to support this innovation? What measures are being taken to accommodate this environmental change and cultural shift in our state? The February 15 forum will present where Michigan stands in self-driving technologies and regulation for autonomous vehicles while creating a vision of Michigan’s future with both driver and driverless autos on our roads.

Panelist Biographical Information :

  • Hayder Radha, University Distinguished Faculty Member, Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering and Director, CANVAS
  • Emily Frascaroli, Legal Counsel for Ford Motor Company
  • Elaina Farnsworth, CEO of Mobile Comply and Director of Global Communications for Connected Vehicle Trade Association
  • Matt Smith, Michigan Department of Transportation’s Intelligent Transportation Systems Administrator)

Video

Pictures

Medicaid Expansion

Wednesday, January 18, 2017

Having opened for registration in April 2014, our state’s Healthy Michigan plan or Medicaid expansion plan has served as a model of innovation in health care coverage for income-disadvantaged residents. Moving into its third year of operation, nearly 618,000 low-income Michiganians, including children, elderly, and the disabled have enrolled in Healthy Michigan. Partly supported by the Affordable Care Act -- better known as Obamacare -- continuation of the plan is in question. A new federal administration insists repeal of the American Care Act as the first action of 2017 to be taken in our nation’s capital. This forum will look to a panel of individuals with diverse expertise in health policy to provide insight into possible scenarios for Healthy Michigan’s future.

Panelist Biographical Information:

  • Larry Martin, Professor of Economics, College of Social Science, Michigan State University
  • Steve Fitton, Principal, Health Management Associates and former State Medicaid Director
  • Amy Zaagman, Executive Director, Michigan Council for Maternal and Child Health
  • Tim Michling, Research Associate, Citizens Research Council of Michigan
  • See all of the panelist biographical information (.pdf)

Video

Presentations

Related News

Emergency Manager Reform in Michigan

Wednesday, September 14, 2016

When cities or school districts fall into fiscal distress, unable to pay bills nor salaries, an Emergency Manager may be assigned by the residing Governor. The role of the Emergency Manager has evolved since it was established through Public Act 101 in 1988. Its goal, however, has remained the same: to assume control, assess and manage financial responsibilities, and bring local governments back in balance before returning them to local control.

In 2011, seven Emergency Managers were active in Michigan. Today, three school districts, but no municipalities, are under Emergency Manager control, presenting for some an image of success. Yet, across the country, there has been mixed review of the effectiveness of Emergency Managers.

This forum, cosponsored by the Center for Local Government Finance and Policy | MSU Extension, will present information on the current role of Michigan’s Emergency Managers and their impact and review what research and experience suggest regarding potential reforms.

Speaker and Panelist Info

  • Eric Scorsone, director for MSU Extension Center for Local Government Finance and Policy, and professor of economics in the Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics
  • Tony Saunders, former emergency manager for Benton Harbor, now Chief Financial Officer and Chief Restructuring Officer for Wayne County, MI
  • Peter Hammer, director for Damon J. Keith Center for Civil Rights and Professor of Law, Wayne State University
  • Craig Thiel, senior research associate for Citizens Research Council of Michigan

Presentations

Video

Access to Mental Health Care

Wednesday, September 07, 2016

The question of adequate access to mental health care across the country often follows today’s headlines speaking of random acts of gun violence, underserved military veterans, and cases of drug addiction. The issue has been paired with conversation at the state level for how best to fund mental health care so that treatment is readily available and afforded by those who seek help or have families who are looking for support. Mental health services have become a mainstay topic for well-being and safety in our communities.

The September 7 policy forum is focused on Michigan citizens’ access to mental health services and possible models for ensuring those in need are readily and properly served. It is cosponsored by the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research and the Sparrow/MSU Center for Research and Innovation.

Panelist and Biographical Information:

  • Sheryl Kubiak, professor of social work, Michigan State University
  • Tom Watkins, president and chief executive officer at Detroit Wayne Mental Health Authority
  • Adrian Blow, associate professor of human development and family studies, Michigan State University
  • Joseph J. Ruth, executive vice president and chief operating officer of Sparrow Health System, will deliver opening remarks.
  • See all of the panelist biographical information (.pdf)

Presentations

Video

Helpful Information/Resources

Renewable Energy Economy: Michigan's Mixed Energy Use Plan

Wednesday, May 18, 2016

Michigan’s Governor challenged the State’s energy providers in March 2015 by calling for 40 percent of the state’s power to come from a combination of renewable energy and energy waste reduction. More natural gas use alongside an increase in renewable energy sources is envisioned for Michigan’s energy future. Additionally, there has been much discussion on how these energy goals might be accomplished with emphasis on related technology innovation and economic opportunities. The May 18 forum will consider how emerging technologies, pricing of various fuel sources and new and developing policies are changing the infrastructure and landscape Michigan’s energy supply.

Forum Speakers include Ann Erhardt, Michigan State University's Director of Sustainability. MSU has made significant strides in transitioning its energy use practices and is set on becoming a model of energy efficiency. Also joining the forum is Robert Jackson, Director of the Regional and National Response Division for the Michigan Agency for Energy. Mr. Jackson oversees the State Energy Program and is directly responsible for the Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy Revolving Loan Program, the Industrial E2 Program, and Technology Demonstration. As a once-visiting researcher at the Energy Institute at Haas at UC Berkeley, a previous staff economist with the White House Council of Economic Advisers, and as a former research assistant at Resources for the Future, Soren Anderson will provide an economic perspective. He is currently an Associate Professor of Economics and Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics at MSU.

Speaker and Panelist Info

Presentations

Picture

Video

Related Article

Gordie Howe International Bridge: Planning for Neighboring Bridge Communities

Wednesday, April 20, 2016

The binational agreements are signed and construction on the New International Trade Crossing (NITC), the Gordie Howe International Bridge, is foreseeable. The bridge spans across the Detroit River to connect the cities of Detroit and Windsor – the United States and Canada. This forum will report on research related to the regional impact of the new bridge and policy considerations for a 2020 completion. Less obvious considerations for a unique and sizeable construction like the bridge will be explored and include housing and services for temporary workers, fluctuations in business activity, and trade and industry flow.

Speakers and Panelist Info

  • Andrew S. Doctoroff Special Projects Advisor, Office of Governor Rick Snyder
  • Bill Anderson, Ph.D., Ontario Research Chair in Cross-Border Transportation Policy and Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Windsor.
  • Zeenat Kotval-Karamchandani, Ph.D., Assistant Professor of Urban & Regional Planning, Michigan State University
  • Roger Hamlin, Ph.D. Professor of Urban Planning and Public Administration, Michigan State University
  • Matt Grossmann, Ph.D., Director, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR), Associate Professor of Political Science
  • AnnMarie Schneider, M.S., Director for Program Planning & Policy Education, IPPSR

Presentations

Video

Flint Water System: State and Local Responsibilities

Wednesday, March 16, 2016

Cosponsored by Michigan State University’s Institute for Public and Policy and Social Research & Institute for Public Utilities

A decision to temporarily move the city of Flint’s water supply from the City of Detroit to the Flint River led to unsafe levels of lead in Flint’s water supply. The decision was financially based as a temporary solution while a pipeline to Lake Huron was under construction. While the city’s water supply was redirected to the City of Detroit once high levels of lead contamination drew a public outcry, a call for new protocol in the decision process in similar situations was called for. This forum will look at developments since the Flint Water situation and the impact it is having in our communities.

Speakers

  • Josh Sapotichne, Assistant Professor, Political Science

    Topic: State vs Local Control of Municipalities. A Mott Foundation funded study on the role of state government in Flint management will serve as the basis of his presentation. More information...

    Interview with Josh Sapotichne

  • Janice Beecher, Professor and Director, MSU Institute for Public Utilities

    Topic: A Comprehensive and Integrative Approach to Infrastructure Planning. Leveraging resources and improving infrastructure management and regulation.

  • Mona Hanna-Attisha, Assistant Professor, Pediatrics and Human Development, MSU College of Human Medicine; Director, Pediatric Residency Program, Hurley Medical Center

    Topic: New Collaborative Pediatric Health Initiative. Methods for improving health outcomes for children exposed to high lead levels. More information...

Presentations

Video

Detroit Public Schools: Quality, Accountability, and Governance

Wednesday, January 20, 2016

Co-sponsored by Michigan State University’s Institute for Public and Policy and Social Research & College of Education at Michigan State University

This forum provides policymakers with insights on how research can be used to help urban schools succeed. Current research activity, both domestic and international, helps us to understand what is needed to help principals successfully lead, teachers to effectively teach, and students to highly achieve. Specifically, panelists will explore options grounded in research for empowering Detroit public schools as well as all urban schools to demonstrate how Michigan may serve as a national model for urban education.

Speakers

  • Kristi Bowman, Associate Dean for Academic Affairs, Professor of Law, Michigan State University
  • Dan Varner, Chief Executive Officer, Excellent Schools Detroit

  • Gary Naeyaert, Executive Director, of Great Lakes Education Project

  • Sarah Reckhow, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Michigan State University

Presentations

Video

Thank you to Digital Spectrum Enterprises (DSE TV 96) in West Michigan for providing this filmed version of the IPPSR Forum Discussion on Detroit Public Schools.

Mackinac Policy Conference

September (?) Town Hall, includes a little more specifics, and Q&A

    Pictures

    See pictures from the Jan 20th, 2016 forum here

    Jan 2016 Forum Panelist Publications Blogs Etc

    See Jan 2016 Forum Panelist Publications Blogs Etc... here

    Proposal I in Review: Roads for a Better Tomorrow or Tomorrow for Better Roads?

    Wednesday, May 06, 2015

    The final forum for the 2015 IPPSR Spring Series will bring together a panel to reflect on the process leading up to the May 5 vote on Proposal I and the outcome of the ballot voting results. The proposal is formally noted as the Michigan Sales Tax Increase for Transportation Amendment, Proposal 1. It is less formally noted as the “Road Ballot.” Simply put, the Road Ballot is intended to change the way transportation infrastructure is funded in Michigan. Instead of taking a percentage of the fuel purchase tax and a percentage of the annual vehicle registration fee to pay for our transportation grid, taxes paid at the fuel pump – aside from a federal tax - would go directly to supporting transportation infrastructure needs and maintenance. This would impact how those tax percentages are currently divided up among local governments, public education and the State’s general Fund. For the exact language of the ballot, see the Michigan Secretary of State website.

    Speakers

    • Roger Martin will join us for a debriefing of the campaign. Mr. Martin has 30 years of award-winning news media, public relations and marketing experience. He is the recipient for top regional and national awards — including the PR industry’s coveted Silver Anvil and multiple “Best of Shows” — for writing, research, and campaign planning and execution. He is a graduate of Michigan State University, where he taught journalism for about a decade. While a reporter and bureau chief at The Detroit News, he won three Pulitzer Prize nominations. Mr. Martin specializes in issue management, media relations, crisis communications and community relations. He has provided winning counseling and services to corporations of all sizes, trade associations, coalitions and individuals.
    • Gilda Jacobs has supported Proposal I as director for the Michigan League for Public Policy. She will discuss the vote outcome and options for moving forward. Ms. Jacobs became League President & CEO on Jan. 3, 2011, following eight years as a state senator and four years as a state representative from Huntington Woods. As senator, Ms. Jacobs was the vice chair of Campaign & Election Oversight; Families & Human Services, and Finance and also served on Economic Development & Regulatory Reform; and Health Policy. Prior to serving in the Legislature, she served as an Oakland County Commissioner, and before that, a city commissioner. She had previously served as Development Director for JARC, a Jewish association providing residential care for persons with disabilities, and earlier as a special education teacher. Ms. Jacobs received her bachelor’s degree with distinction from the University of Michigan, and a master’s degree in behavioral sciences in education.
    • Randall Thompson has served as the Executive Director of the Coalition Against Higher Taxes and Special Interest Deals, the lead opposition to Proposal 1 initiated by businessman Paul Mitchell, Chairman of the Faith & Freedom Coalition of Michigan. Mr. Thompson will reflect on the voters’ response, the campaign path and next steps. He previously served as Chief of Staff in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the Michigan House of Representatives. Additionally, he served as Director of Communications and Spokesman in the U.S. Congress and to both the Secretary of State and Attorney General of the State of Michigan. He holds a Bachelor of Science from Central Michigan University and a Master of Science in Economics from the University of Detroit-Mercy studying under Professor Harry Veryser concentrating on Austrian Economics.
    • Craig Thiel is a Senior Research Associate with the Citizens Research Council, an observer of Proposal 1, who will offer an explanation of action to follow the voting results. Mr. Thiel joined CRC in 2006 and currently serves as a Senior Research Associate assigned to education matters. Before coming to CRC, He worked for the Senate Fiscal Agency for six years and for the House Fiscal Agency for three years. Previous to his time with the Michigan Legislature, Mr. Thiel held positions with the Michigan Department of State, Office of Policy and Planning from 1995 to 1997 and the United States Environmental Protection Agency in Chicago, Illinois from 1991 to 1993. Mr. Thiel holds a B.A. in Economics and Political Science from Kalamazoo College and a Masters in Public Administration from Wayne State University. He holds positions on various professional, nonprofit, and local government boards/associations.

    Citizens Research Council Analysis (.pdf)

    The Gray between Mental Health and Crime

    Wednesday, April 15, 2015

    We see it in the headlines nearly every week. There is a hard-to-define space that often links a person's mental health status with a committed crime. How does Michigan handle such cases? What kinds of diversion programs does the State offer to keep mentally ill citizens out of the criminal justice system? What role do mental health courts play in Michigan crime convictions and sentencing? What has been the impact over the last decade? How do other states manage the question of one's mental health when a crime is committed? What are the models for best practice when an accused person's mental health is questioned? During April's forum, we check in with mental health and criminal justice experts to address these questions.

    Speakers

    • Sheryl Pimlott Kubiak, Professor in the College of Social Science, Department of Social Work, at Michigan State University. Her interests are at the intersections of criminal justice, mental health and substance abuse. She has been a consultant for federal, state and local entities interested in improving service delivery for those with substance abuse and/or mental health disorders. Her priority has been to get individuals with serious mental illness diverted from jail/prison whenever possible. She will talk about mental health screening in jails; mental health courts statewide, and; diversion programs. See the presentation (.pdf)
    • Lois DeMott, a long-time advocate for mentally ill who have wound up in the Criminal Justice System, began her work through a personal journey involving her mentally ill 15 year old son’s incarceration in the adult system. Lois co-founded Citizens for Prison Reform in 2011, a statewide family-led organization. She shed light on the need for reforms in an article published by the Detroit Free Press and then an NBC Documentary in 2012 with Ted Koppel on Juveniles in Isolation across the Nation. She worked for the Association for Children’s Mental Health until awarded a May 2014 Soros Justice Fellowship for developing The Family Participation Program (FPP). See the presentation (.pdf)
    • Candyce Shields is a clinical psychologist at the Center for Forensic Psychiatry in Ann Arbor, Michigan. While psychological assessment is her key area of concentration, Dr. Shields serves as the center’s assistant director and heads evaluation services, a role she has been in for six years. She previously worked as the director of the Work Therapy Program in Ann Arbor’s VA Medical Center, and prior to that, as a psychologist in the Wyoming State Hospital. Her education includes time at Western Michigan University, Chapel Hill at the University of North Carolina, and then, her doctorate degree from the University of Louisville.

     

    Michigan's Connection to Asia

    Wednesday, March 18, 2015

    Michigan is in competition for Asian markets’ direct investment. Our State is calling Asia's attention to Michigan’s automobile exports, agricultural products, and technology innovation, in particular, as well as our natural resources tourism.

    Governor Snyder’s fourth trade mission to Asia in Fall 2014 included the signing of a formal agreement between the State of Michigan and the Shanghai Automotive Industry Cooperation (SAIC). SAIC’s US subsidiary announced Madison Heights, Michigan as home to its new $15 million headquarters. The new digs will add onto about 1,100 jobs currently provided in the State by SAIC, China’s largest original equipment manufacturer. Agreements like this are attracting other foreign investors who recognize Michigan as a win-win opportunity.

    The March forum will look at the State of Michigan’s business interest in Asia and the impact of a reciprocal interest. It will examine the geographic and political factors influencing our work relationship. Finally, the forum discussion will address the interchange of work culture and education systems.

    Specific questions include: What is the outcome of our product and labor exchange with Asian markets? How does Asia's work culture impact our State? How will ties to Asia effect Michigan’s future? Given this deepening connection, are there policy implications to be considered by State legislators?

    Speakers

    • Siddharth Chandra, Professor, James Madison College and Director, MSU Center for Asian Studies, Geopolitical Influence. See the presentation (.pdf)
    • Jeanne Broad, Director of International Trade Management, Michigan Economic Development Corporation, Trade Exchanges. See the presentation (.pdf)

    The Michigan Perspective - State Priorities for 2015

    Wednesday, January 21, 2015

    Please join us for a discussion of top agenda items for Michigan in 2015. With new policymakers taking seats in both the House and Senate, what will be the approach to raising employment in long-term jobs, enhancing Michigan cities as national and international attractions, increasing rural economic development opportunities, and further developing Michigan’s assets, including the Great Lakes and an international border? In this January forum, the Institute for Public Policy and Social Research (IPPSR) will set focus on "Job One" and priority pieces of the State’s strategy intended to make 2015 a successful lead into Michigan's future.

    Speakers

    • Charles Ballard, Professor of Economics and Director of MSU State of the State Survey, Michigan State University. See the presentation (.pdf)
    • Douglas Smith, Senior Vice President for Strategic Partnerships and Government Affairs, Michigan Economic Development Corporation.
    • Richard Studley, Chief Executive Officer, Michigan Chamber of Commerce.
    • Paul M. Hunt, Senior Associate Vice President for Research and Graduate Studies, Michigan State University.

      See the Jan 2015 Speaker Bios Here

    Video

    Watch the January 21st, 2015 Forum Here

    Children of a Hidden Economy: Racial Disparities in Michigans Child Welfare and Juvenile Justice Systems

    Wednesday, May 21, 2014

    Troubling new data suggest that racial inequities exist throughout the various stages of Michigan’s child welfare and juvenile justice systems. The finding that children of color are far more likely than white children to enter and languish in the foster care system is recognized as a critical piece of the hidden economy. These inequities can significantly drain our resources, lead to greater homelessness, unemployment and incarceration and deny young people the promise of a healthy childhood.

    This Forum closes out the 2014 IPPSR Forum Series with a discussion of policy implications of a recently completed statewide study of Michigan’s child welfare and juvenile justice systems.

    The May Forum is cosponsored by and hosts leaders of the Michigan Coalition for Race Equity with support from Casey Family Programs. Coalition Co-chairs Michigan Supreme Court Justice Mary Beth Kelly and policy advocate former Rep. Lynn Jondahl will introduce the newly completed statewide study and its findings.

    The report of the recommendations for policy makers to follow – and for citizens to support – to create a more color-blind and effective system of child welfare and juvenile justice will come before a panel discussion of next steps moving forward. The panel will discuss highlights of the data findings and how they compare with the national perspective. The coalition's recommendations as well as the experience of a pilot project now underway will open the dialogue with audience members.

    Speakers

    • Mary Beth Kelly, Michigan Supreme Court Justice, chair of numerous statewide committees, primarily focused on child welfare and family matters and winner of numerous awards for her work on child welfare issues. Justice Kelly’s presentation: Michigan Race Equity Coalition
    • Former Rep. Lynn Jondahl, whose continuing policy advocacy resonates across social and family issues, responsive taxation and governance, and sustaining environmental and consumer protection measures.
    • Ann Marie Schneider, Director, Program Planning and Development, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. She leads IPPSR’s program planning and development division and advises the Institute’s communications and marketing strategies.
    • Michael Williams, Chief Executive Officer of Orchards Children’s Services.

    Panelists

    Additional Child Welfare Resources

     

    Opening Michigan's Doors to Immigrants

    Wednesday, April 23, 2014

    The university often extends the first welcome to visitors from outside the United States. Visitors come as research scientists, scholars, students, and young professionals wishing to work or study on Michigan’s campuses. Both the State Capitol and the private sector have recently taken an assertive role in retaining and further recruiting this audience. They are inviting visitors to stay in Michigan as employees and employers focused on areas of much-needed talent and expertise. As our universities build world acclaim and as Michigan opens its doors to global business opportunities, more visitors are envisioning making Michigan home for their family and for their business center.

    IPPSR’s April Forum will look to a panel with deep knowledge and experience in opening doors to Michigan’s next generation of global leaders. Why has Michigan set a commitment to opening doors to immigrants? What are the real challenges for doing so? What is the perspective of other regions on state immigration? Are there best practices noted for universities, private sector recruiters and policy makers for working together to grow population and diversify the talent base? How might our state become more inclusive toward new immigrants once they are here? How can we assure that immigration in Michigan does not become migration to regions outside of the Great Lakes?

    Speakers

    • Peter Briggs, Director, MSU Office for International Students and Scholars. Briggs has more than 30 years experience in services to international students and scholars.

      Briggs’ Presentation: International Students in Michigan (.pdf)

    • Steve Tobocman, Director, Global Detroit. Tobocman has spent the past three years spearheading a regional economic revitalization strategy focused on immigration and global connections.

      Immigration and Michigan’s Economic Future (.pdf)

    • Karen Phillippi, Deputy Director, Michigan Office for New Americans. Phillippi has worked in immigration law for more than 20 years.

    • Ann Marie Schneider, Director, Program Planning and Development, Institute for Public Policy and Social Research. She leads IPPSR’s program planning and development division and advises the Institute’s communications and marketing strategies.

    About Forum Speakers

    Learn More about the April Forum Speakers(.pdf) 

    Forum Video Presentation

    View April 23 Forum

    Additional resources on immigration and economic vitality

    Today’s economy: high growth, high prosperity, knowledge based

    Michigan Office for New Americans

    Global Detroit

    WE Global Network

    Welcome Mat Detroit

    Welcoming Michigan

    Welcoming America

    Global Talent Retention Initiative

    Upwardly Global

    MI Dept of Licensing and Regulatory Affairs

    Michigan Imigrants Rights Center

       

      Cultivating Michigan's Innovation Culture

      Wednesday, March 19, 2014

      At the March Forum, we’ll examine Michigan's culture of innovation. How recognizable is Michigan's culture of innovation? How might we better cultivate innovation in our state? What have others done to build their communities as a hub for new ideas and generate innovation? What are the gains of an innovation culture to the region? What policy considerations are there for building a place where people are encouraged and supported to innovate? IPPSR will bring the innovator's story to the audience to demonstrate how innovation, research and policy might synergize to build the job economy, while addressing practical problems.

      Speakers

      • Brian Abraham, Executive Director, Spartan Innovations
      • Paul Krutko, President and CEO of SPARK, a business incubator.
      • Bob Trezise, President and CEO of Lansing Economic Area Partnership Inc.

      About Forum Speakers

       

      What Do State Demographics Say about Michigan's JOB ONE in 2014?

      Wednesday, January 22, 2014

      As we move into the new year, everyone agrees that Michigan is at an important crossroad. Projections for the State's future tend to vary by source.

      The January forum will clarify the current course of the Great Lakes state by focusing on its demographics. What do demographics tell us about the direction of Michigan's population, its education, employment, and business climate? What is the call to action for Michigan residents and leaders? The forum will provide demographic information to consider when prioritizing Michigan's agenda in the new year and beyond. In this year-opening Forum, one of Michigan’s leading demographic authorities will share the state’s latest demographic description and point to the themes suggested within these numbers. One of Michigan’s leading economists will remark on the state’s demographic profile and economic indicators. The Forum discussion will focus on critical themes, possible turning points, key policy considerations and will invite audience participation.

      Speakers

      Speaker Bios (.pdf)